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Copyright and Fair Use

Citing Sources

The Credible Hulk Always Cites His SourcesWriters must be credited for their work and their writing.

Not to do so is to plagiarize.

Plagiarism is defined as intentionally or unintentionally using the ideas, language, or work of another without acknowledgement that such material is not one's own.

Whenever you quote, paraphrase, summarize, or otherwise refer to the work of another, you are required to cite its source. In research papers, any source information that you provide in an in-text citation must correspond to a source in your Works Cited page.

The databases often provide the citation information for the articles in all formats. Look for it!

Image from Reasonist Products

In addition, note that some research databases, such as ProQuest, and free online resources, such as Wikipedia, offer suggested citations in a variety of styles.

 you quote, paraphrase, summarize, or otherwise refer to the work of another, you are required to cite its source. There are several common systems in use. At Otis, the most common style is MLA (which is short for Modern Language Association), but you may come across others. There are style manuals for each style that you can use.

Citation Guide Using MLA Style

MLA CITATION GUIDE

Includes a section on how to cite different types of sources, including oral histories and YouTube comments.

Annotations: The Otis Way

EVALUATIVE ANNOTATIONS

Annotations done the Otis Way are a detailed explanation of your evaluation process. They may be required for some assignments.

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